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by Rob

A visit to Dispro heaven!

November 17, 2019 in Uncategorized

Luckily, both the Dicksons are Dispro enthusiasts!

Imagine owning not one, not two, not three, not four, but FIVE Disappearing Propeller Boats! Welcome to the world of Ian and Barb Dickson, Muskoka cottagers and enthusiasts,  who kindly opened their Muskoka based collection to Port Carling Boats.
The Dicksons have been involved with Dippies for over fifteen years. As you can see from Ian’s meticulous workshop, he really knows what he’s doing with these craft. They are all beautifully preserved. Ian does the engine work himself. Not only that, he is very generous with his time and expertise when consulted by other owners.

The beautiful deck stripping and collapsible brass bow light are features of many Dispros..

A two cylinder Conventry VIctor engine gets a make-over.

The engine box assembly on this Waterman copper jacket can be removed with one fell swoop!

For the uninitiated, Disappearing Propeller Boats, (aka Dispros or Dippies) surfaced about a century ago,  in Muskoka, Ontario. The beauty of these boats is in their simplicity, light weight and the distinctive disappearing propeller mechanism, which when required, will vanish into the housing just above the hull bottom. Very handy for shoals, weeds and beach landings.

A 1920s Dispro with “gull wing” engine hatch covers.

Note Ian’s beautifully organized shop, not to mention the charming Dippy in the foreground.

When asked about his engine preference, I was expecting Ian to nod in the direction of the “newer”, two cylinder Coventry Victor engines, featuring greater thrust with a more modern design.  Surprisingly, Ian expressed a preference for the earlier single cylinder models, such as the Waterman copper jacket, or Dispro engine. These simple engines, he noted, can often be repaired on the fly. Having said that, Ian also commented that if the magnetos on the Coventry Victors are in good shape, these engines will usually provide reliable propulsion.
As we have mentioned in previous blogs, Dispro owners, (like blondes?) have more fun. Off they go in convoys to some of the most unlikely and hair-raising waterways. Luckily, these “pregnant canoes” are seaworthy, and will even handle big swells on Georgian Bay. (Not for the faint hearted, however).
For anyone interested in further information about Disappearing Propeller Boats, The Dispro Owners’ Association is a good place to start. The Association produces a quarterly newsletter, and provides companionship and knowledge for  new-comers. The group can be reached at disproboats.ca
(Stay tuned for the video.)

 

by Rob

Two recently sold classics on Port Carling Boats!

November 12, 2019 in Uncategorized

Congratulations to the vendors and new owners of the two classics listed below.  The  sixteen foot,1959 Century Resorter above, powered by a 135 hp Gray Marine engine, was originally listed at  $9,995.and required some work.   The 1958 fourteen foot Peterborough Capella, below, powered by a 20 hp. Honda outboard,  had been completed refastened and refinished. The package included a trailer. It sold for the full asking price of $10,000.

 

by Rob

Three recently sold classics!

October 25, 2019 in Uncategorized

Congratulations to the vendors and buyers of the three vintage boats listed below. May the new owners enjoy many years of trouble-free boating!

The 1950 twenty foot Duke Special  below, was listed at $10,000 (after a huge price reduction). The lucky buyer of this classic likely purchased “the bargain of the century”!

With an asking price of $11,500, this 17 foot Shepherd (below) was sold in September, complete with trailer.

Finally, the Greavette Disappearing Propeller Boat, (18 ft., 1952 also complete with trailer, sold for close to the asking prices of $6,000
(very reasonably priced for a Dispro)

by Rob

New prices on two eye-catching classics.

October 22, 2019 in Uncategorized

We have been instructed by the owners to reduce the price on each of the two classic listed below.

Century Resorter: 16 ft., 1959

Please see notes from the owner below:
 My 16′ 1959 Century Resorter, Avalon was custom built for a cottager on Lake Rosseau and was one of the last all wood Centurys built. The bottom, chines and stem were replaced by Stan Hunter Boatworks in 2006 and the transom by Duke Marine Services in 2010. It does need some bottom work now and would be a good repair/restoration project  The Grey Marine   135 HP   V8 engine was rebuilt, has low hours and is in good running order. The boat shows well, with original chrome hardware, mahogany planking and the upholstery is in good shape. It has been stored in our boathouse, regularly serviced by The Boatworks in Port Carling and is now winterized, covered and stored at Brackley Boats in Gravenhurst.  It’ is  priced to sell,

Original Price: $9,995     New price $3,900 CDN  WOW!   For further details and contact information, please click on the link.  Ad number pb866

 

Owens Tahitian; 40 ft., 1964

This 40 FT. Owens Tahitian is one of the last few solid mahogany double planked hulls sides and bottom. The decks are solid teak. The cabin roof is fiberglass with some unique hardware. The large cabin side engine air vents are trade mark of Owens. There has bean extensive work done to the hull and interior of the boat. The Owens is powered by twin G>M Flagship engines. The Owens comes equipped with a a 6.5 KW Koehler generator .The upholstery and canvas top and curtain are recently new and in nice condition.

Original Price: $7,950.  New price $6,500 (Sept 2019)   For details and contact information, please click on the link.  Ad number pb874
For a video of the interior of the Owens, click on the video below. (Additional photos also below)

by Rob

A classic cutter laps up some TLC!

October 15, 2019 in Uncategorized


Many thanks to Peter Code, a Toronto based restorer, for the story below..
“These three photos are of a rescue boat named Bittersweet, one of the last Ladies of the Lake Ontario Cruising fleet from the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. I am sleeping down on her this weekend (earlier this fall) before mast is pulled in the morning, and the cutter hauled the following weekend.
She was designed by Phillip Rhodes in 1934 as Dog Star. Bittersweet was built in Nova Scotia in 1964 for Mac and Thelma Murdoch at the  RCYC and delivered by rail.She sails beautifully and also has a Volvo Diesel auxiliary engine. The accommodations sleep 4, and she comes with an ice fridge, head and stove.
Bittersweet may come on on the market for the right owners but for now a shipwright and his family are enjoying the  fun of restoring and sailing this beautiful yacht.

Bittersweet is currently lying in Port of Newcastle, Ontario and will be worked on over the winter by Peter Code and family under cover only  60 feet from the shores of Lake Ontario

For the wooden  boat warriors out there Bittersweet is planked with Alaskan yellow cedar on white oak frames.  This is about as long lasting a pairing as you could find .   The Mahogany on the cabin is where Peter has found rot and ripped that out immediately. The decks are ply but good and strong . The  mast is a 44 foot long Sitka Spruce.

I (Peter) admit that I am more of a Wooden Boat Magazine armchair sailor, as my father subscribed from issue 1, but this yacht is a treat to any wooden boat owner ,
Cheers, Peter and helpers Annie and Jessie”

Port Carling Boats – Antique & Classic Wooden Boats for Sale